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SOAP Web Service Fault Handling

SOAP errors are handled using a specialized envelope known as a Fault Envelope. If SOAP Fault occurs while processing the received SOAP message, it constructs a SOAP Fault and sends it back to the client.


SOAP faults are generated by receivers, either an intermediary or the ultimate receiver of a message. The receiver is required to send a SOAP fault back to the sender only if the Request/Response messaging mode is used. In One-Way mode, the receiver should generate a fault and may store it somewhere, but it must not attempt to transmit it to the sender.


SOAP faults are returned to the receiver's immediate sender. For example, if the third node in a message path generates a fault, that fault message is sent to the second node in the message path and nowhere else. In other words, you don't send the fault to the original sender unless it's also the immediate sender. When that sender receives the fault message, it may take some action, such as undoing operations, and may send another fault further upstream to the next sender if there is one.


A SOAP message that contains a Fault element in the Body is called a fault message. A fault message is analogous to a Java exception; it's generated when an error occurs. Fault messages are used in Request/Response messaging. Nodes in the message path generate them when processing a request message. When an error occurs, the receiving node sends a fault message back to the sender just upstream, instead of the anticipated reply message. Faults are caused by improper message formatting, version mismatches, trouble processing a header, and application-specific errors.


When a fault message is generated, the Body of the SOAP message must contain only a single Fault element and nothing else. The Fault element itself must contain a faultcode element and a faultstring element, and optionally faultactor and detail elements. Listing 4-18 is an example of a SOAP fault message.


SOAP Fault Message

<?xml version= "1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
xmlns:mh="http://www.Monson-Haefel.com/jwsbook/BookQuote">
<soap:Body>
<soap:Fault>
<faultcode>soap:Client</faultcode>
<faultstring>The ISBN value contains invalid characters</faultstring>
<faultactor>http://www.xyzcorp.com</faultactor>
<detail>
<mh:InvalidIsbnFaultDetail>
<offending-value>19318224-D</offending-value>
<conformance-rules>
The first nine characters must be digits. The last
character may be a digit or the letter 'X'. Case is
not important.
</conformance-rules>
</mh:InvalidIsbnFaultDetail>
</detail>
</soap:Fault>
</soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>

Note that the Fault element and its children are part of the SOAP namespace, just as the SOAP Envelope and Body elements are.


faultcode

The faultcode element should contain one of the standard codes listed above, with the appropriate SOAP namespace prefix. Prefixing the code, as in soap:Client, allows for easy versioning of standard fault codes. As SOAP evolves, it's possible that new fault codes will be added. New fault codes can easily be distinguished from legacy fault codes by their namespace prefix. The meaning of a fault code will always correlate to both the code (the local name) and the namespace (the prefix).


Client Fault

The Client fault code signifies that the node that sent the SOAP message caused the error. Basically, if the receiver cannot process the SOAP message because there is something wrong with the message or its data, it's considered the fault of the client, the sender. The receiving node generates a Client fault if the message is not well formed, or contains invalid data, or lacks information that was expected, like a specific header. For example

<?xml version= "1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
xmlns:mh="http://www.Monson-Haefel.com/jwsbook/BookQuote">
<soap:Body>
<soap:Fault>
<faultcode>soap:Client</faultcode>
<faultstring>The ISBN value contains invalid characters</faultstring>
<detail/>
</soap:Fault>
</soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>

Server Fault

The Server fault code indicates that the node that received the SOAP message malfunctioned or was otherwise unable to process the SOAP message. This fault is a reflection of an error by the receiving node (either an intermediary or the ultimate receiver) and doesn't point to any problems with the SOAP message itself. In this case the sender can assume the SOAP message to be correct, and can redeliver it after pausing some period of time to give the receiver time to recover.

<?xml version= "1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
xmlns:mh="http://www.Monson-Haefel.com/jwsbook/BookQuote">
<soap:Body>
<soap:Fault>
<faultcode>soap:Server</faultcode>
<faultstring>Database is unavailable.</faultstring>
<detail/>
</soap:Fault>
</soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>

VersionMismatch Fault

A receiving node generates a VersionMismatch fault when it doesn't recognize the namespace of a SOAP message's Envelope element. For example, a SOAP 1.1 node will generate a fault with a VersionMismatch code if it receives a SOAP 1.2 message, because it finds an unexpected namespace in the Envelope. This scenario is illustrated by the fault message

<?xml version= "1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/"
xmlns:mh="http://www.Monson-Haefel.com/jwsbook/BookQuote">
<soap:Body>
<soap:Fault>
<faultcode>soap:VersionMismatch</faultcode>
<faultstring>Message was not SOAP 1.1-conformant</faultstring>
<detail/>
</soap:Fault>
</soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>

The VersionMismatch fault applies only to the namespace assigned to the Envelope, Header, Body, and Fault elements. It does not apply to other parts of the SOAP message, like the header blocks, XML document version, or application-specific elements in the Body.


faultstring Element

The faultstring element is mandatory. It should provide a human-readable description of the fault. Although the faultstring element is required, the text used to describe the fault is not standardized.


faultactor Element

The faultactor element indicates which node encountered the error and generated the fault (the faulting node). This element is required if the faulting node is an intermediary, but optional if it's the ultimate receiver.


detail Element

The detail element of a fault message must be included if the fault was caused by the contents of the Body element, but it must not be included if the error occurred while processing a header block. The detail element may contain any number of application-specific elements, which may be qualified or unqualified, according to their XML schema. In addition, the detail element itself may contain any number of qualified attributes, as long as they do not belong to the SOAP 1.1 namespace, "http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope".

It's perfectly legal to use an empty detail element, but you must not omit the detail element entirely if the fault resulted while processing the contents of the original message's Body element.


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